BookShelf: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

9460487A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of curious photographs.

A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.

A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography.
~Goodreads

I picked up this book because I had come across opinions that said it was “horrifying and gave me nightmares” or “kept me reading till morning” and as a result, I was prepared to be as terrified as Ted the Caver.
I was sorely disappointed.

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children starts off with Jacob explaining his relationship with his grandfather and the stories he used to share when Jacob was younger. The stories consisted of how his grandfather joined the army in WW2 and fought “monsters”. As Jacob grows older, he casts these tales aside until one day, one of the monsters comes back into his life and murders his grandfather. Off goes Jacob, on a hunt to rediscover his grandfather.

There was a lot of potential for spookyness. I mean, a creepy town on an island with only one landline, no mobile signals, swamps and bogs and a museum has a lot of potential. Unfortunately, very little of these were utilized. The only part where I felt some creepyness was the part where Jacob was snooping around the derelict house.

The text is punctuated with vintage photographs

The children were in no way dangerous or quarantined or anything. It might’ve been scary if that was actually true, but it didn’t seem that way at all. On top of that, they might have had the body of children, but as each stated their ages, they were all seniorly aged, at least 70+. So that was another really weird thing, considering how they still acted like children.
I really enjoyed the creepy photographs though. They made the whole book worth it. I think a book is amazing if it affects your life, and this book affected mine by introducing me to vintage photography- which I think I’ve fallen in love with now. (This isn’t really related to the story or doesn’t seem to fit in a book review, but honestly. I love this book for this very reason).

The monsters in MPHFPC…
Simply misunderstood and mind controlled Ood? Call in the Doctor!

Last but not least, the book ends in an absolute cliff hanger that will make you say “What. What kind of ending was that”. It makes you wonder what happens next, but I for one, was not persuaded to dig around for the sequel just yet.

I’d give this book a ratting of 4/5 stars.

Happy reading ^^.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Author: Kanra Khan

I'm a Pakistani American student of medicine, or more precisely, an almost-graduate of MBBS Class of 2019. I like to write about my experiences in med school and my adventures in life, which range from traveling, to art, to blogging and photography. Like what you're seeing so far? Consider exploring a bit more! The Lunar Descent is endless.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.